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Make Your Photos Email Friendly

by on May 14, 2009
in Cameras and Photography, Photo / Video Sharing, Computers and Software, Tips & How-Tos :: 4 comments

Have you ever tried to email photos to someone, only to have it bounce back?

Most digital cameras today take pictures that are three or more megabytes per picture and most email systems, whether they’re corporate or personal, limit the size of each email received. So, even if you’re attaching just a few photos, you’re potentially clogging inboxes, or your email may not get there at all.

To learn how to easily create and send small photo files, take a look at our helpful video below.  And, for a step-by-step walk-through, click here if you're using:

Internet-based Email Program (Gmail, Hotmail, AOL)

  1. Browse to www.WebResizer.com.
  2. Click on “resize photos now.”
  3. Click on the “browse” button in the “upload an image” box. A separate window will open. Select the photo you want to resize and click the “open” button.
  4. Back on the Web page you will see the file. Click the “upload image” button. Your image will appear on the web page.
  5. Click on “download this image.” Select “save” when the download window pops up.
  6. Another window will pop up to let you select the file name and where to save the file.
  7. Create an e-mail message and select the option to attach a file. Browse to the file or files, attach them, and hit send.

Outlook with Windows Vista

  1. Browse to the folder where your files are stored. If you haven’t changed the computer’s default settings, they’ll be in the “pictures” folder.
  2. Right click on one of the selected pictures. Select “send to” and then “mail recipient.”
  3. A dialog box will pop up with a pull-down menu for “picture size.” The higher the resolution you chose, the larger the file will be, but also the better prints your recipients can make. Once you’ve selected the “picture size,” click on “attach.”
  4. An e-mail will open with the pictures already attached. It may take a few seconds, so don’t worry. Fill in the e-mail address, type in a message, and hit send.

Outlook with Windows XP

  1. Browse to the folder where your files are stored. If you haven’t changed the computer’s default settings, they’ll be in the “my pictures” folder.
  2. Right click on one of the selected pictures. Select “send to” and then “mail recipient.”
  3. A dialog box will pop up.  Click on the button next to “make all my pictures smaller,” or select “show more options” to choose your image size. Once you’ve selected the picture size, click on “ok.”
  4. An e-mail will open with the pictures already attached. It may take a few seconds, so don’t worry. Fill in the e-mail address, type in a message, and hit send.

Mac OS X Leopard

  1. Open iPhoto
  2. Select the photos you want to send by holding down the “command” key and clicking on them. Release the “command” key.
  3. On the top menu bar select “share” and then “email.” A dialog box will pop up with a pull-down menu for “size.” The higher the resolution you chose, the larger the file will be, but also the better prints your recipients can make. Once you’ve selected the “size,” click on “compose message.”
  4. An e-mail will open with the pictures already attached. It may take a few seconds, so don’t worry. Fill in the e-mail address and hit send.

Discussion loading

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From winegal on August 31, 2009 :: 1:19 pm

Great tip, S - can you save that resized, lower res file and upload it to a Web or blog page? Or is it better to have Blogger resize the original higher res file?

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From Suzanne Kantra on August 31, 2009 :: 11:38 pm

You can save the lower res file if you email a copy to yourself or use the webresize.com option outlined above.

Blogger’s resize utility works fine, and you’ll probably want to fine tune the sizing anyway. The main reason you’d want to resize before uploading is that there’s a limit to the number of photos you can store before you have to start paying for storage. The limit is 1GB, or about 300-500 photos.

If you’ll be doing a lot of file resizing, I’d download a utility like FastStone Photo Resizer 2.8 that’s available for free from cnet.com

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Mary Black

From Mary Black on May 06, 2011 :: 1:46 pm

Hi Suzanne,

Great post by the way.

I just have a question that is not totally related, but possibly you may know.

I have been trying to send images in the body of an email, but everytime the recipient gets the email, they have to download the images before they can see them.

Now this is slightly annoying as many of the people (normally relatives) who I send photographs to, are either too nervous to download the photos, or just don’t know how to.

Do you know of a way that I could force download of the photographs / images, so I don’t have this issue?

Any help you can give me would be most appreciated and thanks in advance.

Ciao ciao, Mary wink

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Connect to email address

From Paula on August 08, 2016 :: 8:17 am

Hi Suzzanne,
I used to be able to attach my photos to an email like you have outlined above (outlook with windows), but then my computer updated to Windows 10 and now it won’t work.  Do you know how to get it working or how to link it to my email address?
Thanks, Paula

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