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10 Products that Belong in Your Car Emergency Kit

posted by on June 17, 2019 in Car Tech & Safety, Travel & Entertainment, Guides & Reviews :: 8 comments

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From summer road trips to our morning commutes, we all spend a lot of time in our cars — but we don't always spend enough time thinking about safety. Carrying a good car safety kit can help you avoid being stranded with a flat tire or help emergency services find you if a camping trip goes awry. And if you know what to put in it, an emergency kit isn't tough to put together. Here are ten gadgets, from high-tech GPS locators to simple emergency escape tools, that could be a good fit for your own emergency kit. Some of these items pull double duty, so pick and choose those that have the features that make the most sense for you.


Fix-A-Flat Ultimate 1-Step Tire Repair Kit

Charge Your Smartphone: Jackery Bolt battery pack

Though you might not think of it as part of an emergency kit, you'll be glad to have a charger handy if your phone runs out of power when you're in distress. A smartphone can be the most important piece of safety gear you have, letting you call for help, find your way if you get lost, snap photos of damage if you're in an accident, and even offer first aid help.

But it can't do any of those things if the battery's dead, which is where the Jackery Bolt comes in. With built-in lightning and micro USB cables, you don't need to remember to pack cables (unless your phone uses USB-C): all you need to charge up is the battery pack itself. This 6000mAH model has the power to charge an iPhone Xs or Galaxy S10 once.  You just have to remember to charge the Jackery Bolt occasionally, so it's ready when you need it.

Price: $29.99 on Jackerycheck price on Amazon


Jumpstart Your Car: Cobra JumPack Mini

If your battery dies, you could wind up stuck on the side of the road for quite awhile even if you call a friend (or AAA). But if you pack your own jumpstart, there's no waiting required. The Cobra JumPack Mini is pricey at just under $100, but this easy jumpstarter is a real lifesaver if your battery dies.

Despite its portable size — it weighs in at just .89 pounds —  the JumPack is powerful enough to start most vehicles, even those with V8 engines. Using it will be familiar to anyone who's ever jumpstarted a car before: just plug jumper cables from the JumPack to your car battery, then start the car. And for those that aren't familiar, the JumPack Mini takes out all of the guess work. A green light indicates that the device has enough power, that it's attached properly and that it's safe to restart you car. 

However, the JumPack is handy even if your battery doesn't die. It can charge your smartphone (though you'll need a charging cable or a phone that supports wireless charging) and has rapid charging, supporting Qualcomm Quick Charge. 

Price: $99.95 on Cobra, check price on Amazon


Slim Emergency Flat Tire Repair Kit

Fix a Flat Tire: Slime Flat Tire Repair Kit

Getting a flat tire can really ruin your day, but if you have the right equipment, a flat can be easy to fix. The 2-step tire repair kit is a super simple way to repair and re-inflate your tires.

All you have to do is use the sealant and then connect the Slime Flat Tire Repair Kit to your tire and plug the Slime into your car's 12V outlet. It will fill your tire with air to get you back on the road fast. It takes just about 15 minutes to repair and inflate a tire. Slime claims the repair will last up to 500 miles. You will have to replace the sealant after use, but for about $10 per bottle (check price on Amazon), it definitely costs less than calling a tow truck.

Price: $26.39 on Slime, on check price on Amazon


First Alert Emergency Roadside Beacon

Stay Safe on the Side of the Road: First Alert Emergency Roadside Beacon

Though jumpstarting your car or fixing a flat tire may be easy with the tools above, working on your car on the side of the road can be dangerous, especially in the dark. Keeping some hazard lights in your emergency kit helps other drivers know to give you space.

The First Alert Emergency Roadside Beacon comes with three red LED lights that are waterproof and crush resistant: perfect for roadside use, no matter what the conditions.

Price: $24.95, check price on Amazon


Kizen LED Camping Lantern

Light Your Way: Kizen LED Camping Lantern

This bright white LED light isn't appropriate as a roadside hazard warning, but it's ideal for providing light to work if your car breaks down at night, even in the rain. (And it makes a great camping companion, too.) The water-resistant Kizen lantern can be charged via its solar panel or by plugging it in, and a full charge will keep it lit for ten hours — more than long enough for even the worst roadside disaster. And unlike a flashlight, these lanterns are hands-free, so you'll have plenty of light, whether you set it on the ground next to a flat tire or hang it under the hood of your car while you jumpstart a dead battery.

Price: $16.95,  check price on Amazon


Eton Emergency Weather Radio

Stay on Top of the Weather: Eton Emergency Weather Radio

Dangerous weather conditions are a real risk when you're out driving, whether you're heading off the grid for a camping trip or just taking a trip across town. If you're caught out in a storm, you may be grateful for an emergency weather radio to stay up to date on current conditions — especially one that doesn't need batteries.

The rugged Eton FRX5BT (or the smaller Eton Scorpion II) can be charged from the wall or powered by a hand crank and has a solar panel for power, too. But this reliable weather radio has some great bonuses: it can charge your phone's battery via USB cable and act as a Bluetooth speaker, which makes it a particularly handy piece of gear to have for your next camping trip. The more budget-friendly Eton Scorpion II has a smaller battery and won't act as a speaker, but otherwise has the same stellar feature set as the FRX5BT — pick up whichever better fits your needs.

Price: FRX5BT $99.99 on EtonCorp (check price on Amazon), Scorpion II $49.99 on EtonCorp (check price on Amazon)


ACR ResQLink+ Personal Locator Beacon

Get Help Whenever You Need It: ACR ResQLink 400 Personal Locator Beacon

While this may be a bit much for most car safety kits, a personal locator beacon — which contacts emergency services with your location no matter where you are — could save your life if you plan on traveling through under-populated areas. The ResQLink 400 uses GPS and satellite to link you to the world (though, no, you can't use it to check email or send texts), and if you're in danger, a push of a button can contact search and rescue services.                    

This pocket-sized gadget works when cell phones won't, it is rugged enough to withstand harsh weather conditions and it doesn't have any subscription fee. Whether you're heading somewhere without good cellular service or you're worried about the next hurricane, an emergency beacon is a good idea.

Price: $309.95 on ACR Artexcheck price on Amazon


LifeStraw Personal Water Filter

Find Drinking Water Anywhere: LifeStraw Go Water Filtering Bottle

Though this one may also seem extreme for your car safety kit, this is another important piece of gear to carry if you're venturing far from civilization. The LifeStraw Go is a water bottle with a filter that removes 99.9999% of waterborne bacteria and 99.9% of waterborne protozoan parasites from water, meaning you can find fresh water anywhere. That can be ideal if you're camping or caught in a natural disaster that disrupts access to drinking water.

With the LifeStraw Go, you can fill up from any water source and the water is filtered as it passes through the bottle's straw. There are no complicated instructions to remember though you should replace the filter straw every 244 gallons. There's no reason not to buy it and toss it in your emergency kit.

Price: $44.95 on LifeStraw (check price on Amazon)


Lifehammer Emergency Tool

Escape an Accident: Lifehammer Emergency Tool Orange

Being trapped in your car after an accident is a terrifying thought, but you can save yourself that worry with an emergency tool. The Lifehammer is designed to be mounted within easy reach (with an included bracket), so you'll always have help within reach. The tool includes a hammer that can break through car windows so you can escape from your vehicle when using the door isn't an option. And if the seatbelts have jammed, a super-sharp blade will slice through them — though its plastic housing keeps your fingers safe from the sharp edge.

It's certainly something you never want to have to use, but it's better to have it and not need it — and at just under $15, it won't bust your budget.

Price: $15, check price on Amazon

Updated with new products on 6/17/2019

[Image credit: broken down car via BigStockPhoto, Jackery, Garmin, Cobra, Slime, First Alert, Kizen, ETON, ACR, LifeStraw, Lifehammer]



Discussion loading

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Why only Amazon

From Imme629 on August 07, 2017 :: 6:53 pm

Why not provide another seller besides Amazon?
After getting a few fakes from them, I’m hesitant to spend any serious money there again.

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I'm surprised

From Josh Kirschner on August 07, 2017 :: 7:45 pm

We use Amazon because they have the broadest selection of products and, almost always, the best prices (fell disclosure: we also have an affiliate relationship with them). I would be extremely surprised if you got anything directly from Amazon that was fake. Perhaps with some of the third-party sellers, which is why you should always order directly from Amazon, when possible, but not from Amazon direct. And if you do have an issue, Amazon customer service will usually resolve quickly.

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Exactly right! I've been a

From Buster Chappell on June 28, 2018 :: 10:26 am

Exactly right! I’ve been a Amazon customer since 2001 and have no complaints.

Reply

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Analyzing fake reviews helps prevent buying fakes

From Shesca on December 02, 2019 :: 8:16 am

To avoid purchasing fake items from Amazon, you should use FakeSpot Analyzer (https://www.fakespot.com/), which analyzes the reviews for every Amazon product. It is excellent in identifying reviews that are fake, and attaching a score to the reviews that represents the level of fake reviews.
I have used it many, many times, and it is incredibly helpful.

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Maybe just a bit overboard?

From Kurt Spieldenner on August 08, 2017 :: 10:10 am

The cell phone battery pack you mentioned can be replaced with the jump-start pack, item number 3 on your list they also charge cell phones and have high capacity batteries so why carry both? Also as for buying a separate GPS unit you can just download the (free, no ads) Here! App on your cell phone and pre-download your state. Since you now have a battery charger to charge your cell phone you can just use that mapping software with your cell phones GPS and you don’t need an internet connection. And although the locator device is nice when you’re up in the mountains hiking around in the middle of nowhere, having one in the back of your car is questionable. This article strikes me as more of a sales ad than an actual emergency kit for the average person’s car. But if you have a huge trunk and lots of space to fill up with expensive gadgets then more power to you.

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Fix a Flat? Maybe not!

From Buster Chappell on June 28, 2018 :: 10:26 am

https://www.dealnews.com/features/Heres-Why-You-Should-Think-Twice-Before-Using-Tire-Sealant/1742217.html

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Slime

From Robert on June 17, 2019 :: 6:42 pm

Some (maybe all) versions of Slime will destroy your tire pressure sensors.  Really important to check recommendations with knowledgeable people before making them.

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Slime won't destroy TPMS sensors

From Josh Kirschner on June 19, 2019 :: 11:49 am

Slime doesn’t damage TMPS sensors, though it can gunk them up and make them inoperable until cleaned. So Slime advises that you remove the tire, clean out the slime (it is water-soluble) and repair the tire within 3 days or 100 miles, which you should do anyway since Slime is only meant as a temporary repair for emergency situations.

In an ideal situation, using a spare tire is the better solution. But if your spare is inoperable or you don’t have a spare (about 30% of new vehicles don’t), and roadside assistance isn’t available to tow your car to a tire repair shop or there isn’t a an open repair shop nearby (middle of nowhere at 1am?), then Slime could end up being a real life saver - cleaning a tire and TPMS sensor is well worth the trade-off in those situations.

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