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How to Tell if Your Phone Has Been Hacked

by on February 09, 2017
in Privacy, Phones and Mobile, Mobile Apps, Tips & How-Tos :: 219 comments

How to Tell if Your Phone Has Been Hacked

By now, government spying is such a common refrain that we may have become desensitized to the notion that the NSA taps our phone calls or the FBI can hack our computers whenever it wants. Yet there are other technological means – and motives – for hackers, criminals and even the people we know, such as a spouse or employer, to hack into our phones and invade our privacy.

From targeted breaches and vendetta-fueled snooping to opportunistic land grabs for the data of the unsuspecting, here are seven ways someone could be spying on your cell phone – and what you can do about it.

1. Spy apps

There is a glut of phone monitoring apps designed to covertly track someone’s location and snoop on their communications. Many are advertised to suspicious partners or distrustful employers, but still more are marketed as a legitimate tool for safety-concerned parents to keep tabs on their kids. Such apps can be used to remotely view text messages, emails, internet history, and photos; log phone calls and GPS locations; some may even hijack the phone’s mic to record conversations made in person. Basically, almost anything a hacker could possible want to do with your phone, these apps would allow.

And this isn’t just empty rhetoric. When we studied cell phone spying apps back in 2013, we found they could do everything they promised. Worse, they were easy for anyone to install, and the person who was being spied on would be none the wiser that there every move was being tracked.

“There aren’t too many indicators of a hidden spy app – you might see more internet traffic on your bill, or your battery life may be shorter than usual because the app is reporting back to a third-party,” says Chester Wisniewski, principal research scientist at security firm Sophos.

Likelihood

Spy apps are available on Google Play, as well as non-official stores for iOS and Android apps, making it pretty easy for anyone with access to your phone (and a motive) to download one.

How to protect yourself

  • Since installing spy apps require physical access to your device, putting a passcode on your phone greatly reduces the chances of someone being able to access your phone in the first place. And since spy apps are often installed by someone close to you (think spouse or significant other), pick a code that won’t be guessed by anyone else.
  • Go through your apps list for ones you don’t recognize.
  • Don’t jailbreak your iPhone. “If a device isn’t jailbroken, all apps show up,” says Wisniewski. “If it is jailbroken, spy apps are able to hide deep in the device, and whether security software can find it depends on the sophistication of the spy app [because security software scans for known malware].”
  • For iPhones, ensuring you phone isn’t jailbroken also prevents anyone from downloading a spy app to your phone, since such software – which tampers with system-level functions - doesn’t make it onto the App Store.
  • Android users can download a mobile security app that will flag malicious programs. There isn’t the same type of mobile security apps for iOS, due to App Store restrictions, though Lookout Security and Sophos will alert you if your iPhone has been jailbroken.

2. Phishing by message

Whether it’s a text claiming to be from your financial institution, or a friend exhorting you to check out this photo of you last night, SMSes containing deceptive links that aim to scrape sensitive information (otherwise known as phishing or “smishing”) continue to make the rounds.

Android phones may also fall prey to messages with links to download malicious apps. (The same scam isn’t prevalent for iPhones, which are commonly non-jailbroken and therefore can’t download apps from anywhere except the App Store.)

Such malicious apps may expose a user’s phone data, or contain a phishing overlay designed to steal login information from targeted apps – for example, a user’s bank or email app.

Likelihood

Quite likely. Though people have learned to be skeptical of emails asking them to “click to see this funny video!”, security lab Kaspersky notes that they tend to be less wary on their phones.

How to protect yourself

  • Keep in mind how you usually verify your identity with various accounts – for example, your bank will never ask you to input your full password or PIN.
  • Avoid clicking links from numbers you don’t know, or in curiously vague messages from friends, especially if you can’t see the full URL.
  • If you do click on the link and end up downloading an app, your Android phone should notify you. Delete the app and/or run a mobile security scan.

3. SS7 global phone network vulnerability

Nearly two years ago, it was discovered that a communication protocol for mobile networks across the world, Signalling System No 7 (SS7), has a vulnerability that lets hackers spy on text messages, phone calls and locations, armed only with someone’s mobile phone number. An added concern is that text message is a common means to receive two-factor authentication codes from, say, email services or financial institutions – if these are intercepted, an enterprising hacker could access protected accounts, wrecking financial and personal havoc.

According to security researcher Karsten Nohl, law enforcement and intelligence agencies use the exploit to intercept cell phone data, and hence don’t necessarily have great incentive to seeing that it gets patched.

Likelihood

Extremely unlikely, unless you’re a political leader, CEO or other person whose communications could hold high worth for criminals. Journalists or dissidents travelling in politically restless countries may be at an elevated risk for phone tapping.

How to protect yourself

  • Use an end-to-end encrypted message service that works over the internet (thus bypassing the SS7 protocol), says Wisniewski. WhatsApp (free, iOS/Android), Signal (free, iOS/Android) and Wickr Me (free, iOS/Android) all encrypt messages and calls, preventing anyone from intercepting or interfering with your communications.
  • Be aware that if you are in a potentially targeted group your phone conversations could be monitored and act accordingly.

4. Snooping via open Wi-Fi networks

Thought that password-free Wi-Fi network with full signal bars was too good to be true? It might just be. Eavesdroppers on an unsecured Wi-Fi network can view all its unencrypted traffic. And nefarious public hotspots can redirect you to lookalike banking or email sites designed to capture your username and password. And it’s not necessarily a shifty manager of the establishment you’re frequenting. For example, someone physically across the road from a popular coffee chain could set up a login-free Wi-Fi network named after the café, in hopes of catching useful login details for sale or identity theft.

Likelihood

Any tech-savvy person could potentially download the necessary software to intercept and analyze Wi-Fi traffic – including your neighbor having a laugh at your expense (you weren’t browsing NSFW websites again, were you?).

How to protect yourself

  • Only use secured networks where all traffic is encrypted by default during transmission to prevent others from snooping on your Wi-Fi signal.
  • Download a VPN app to encrypt your smartphone traffic. SurfEasy VPN (iOS, Android) provides 500MB of traffic free, after which it’s $2.99/month.
  • If you must connect to a public network and don’t have a VPN app, avoid entering in login details for banking sites or email. If you can’t avoid it, ensure the URL in your browser address bar is the correct one. And never enter private information unless you have a secure connection to the other site (look for “https” in the URL and a green lock icon in the address bar).

5. Unauthorized access to iCloud or Google account

Hacked iCloud and Google accounts offer access to an astounding amount of information backed up from your smartphone – photos, phonebooks, current location, messages, call logs and in the case of the iCloud Keychain, saved passwords to email accounts, browsers and other apps. And there are spyware sellers out there who specifically market their products against these vulnerabilities.

Online criminals may not find much value in the photos of regular folk – unlike nude pictures of celebrities that are quickly leaked– but they know the owners of the photos do, says Wisniewski, which can lead to accounts and their content being held digitally hostage unless victims pay a ransom.

Additionally, a cracked Google account means a cracked Gmail, the primary email for many users.

Having access to a primary email can lead to domino-effect hacking of all the accounts that email is linked to – from your Facebook account to your mobile carrier account, paving the way for a depth of identity theft that would seriously compromise your credit.

Likelihood

“This is a big risk. All an attacker needs is an email address; not access to the phone, nor the phone number,” Wisniewski says. If you happen to use your name in your email address, your primary email address to sign up for iCloud/Google, and a weak password that incorporates personally identifiable information, it wouldn’t be difficult for a hacker who can easily glean such information from social networks or search engines.

How to protect yourself

  • Create a strong password for these key accounts (and as always, your email).
  • Enable login notifications so you’re aware of sign-ins from new computers or locations.
  • Enable two-factor authentication so that even if someone discovers your password they can’t access your account without access to your phone.
  • To prevent someone resetting your password, lie when setting up password security questions. You would be amazed how many security questions rely on information that is easily available on the Internet or is widely known by your family and friends.

6. Malicious charging stations

Well-chosen for a time when smartphones barely last the day and Google is the main way to not get lost, this hack leverages our ubiquitous need for juicing our phone battery, malware be damned. Malicious charging stations – including malware-loaded computers – take advantage of the fact that standard USB cables transfer data as well as charge battery. Older Android phones may even automatically mount the hard drive upon connection to any computer, exposing its data to an unscrupulous owner.

Security researchers have also shown it’s possible to hijack the video-out feature on most recent phones so that when plugged into a malicious charge hub, a hacker can monitor every keystroke, including passwords and sensitive data.

Likelihood

Low. There are no widely known instances of hackers exploiting the video-out function, while newer Android phones ask for permission to load their hard drive when plugged into a new computer; iPhones request a PIN. However, new vulnerabilities may be discovered.

How to protect yourself

  • Don’t plug into unknown devices; bring a wall charger. You might want to invest in a charge-only USB cable like PortaPow ($6.99 on Amazon)
  • If a public computer is your only option to revive a dead battery, select the “Charge only” option (Android phones) if you get a pop-up when you plug in, or deny access from the other computer (iPhone).

7. FBI’s StingRay (and other fake cellular towers)

An ongoing initiative by the FBI to tap phones in the course of criminal investigations (or indeed, peaceful protests) involves the use of cellular surveillance devices (the eponymous StingRays) that mimic bona fide network towers.

StingRays, and similar pretender wireless carrier towers, force nearby cell phones to drop their existing carrier connection to connect to the StingRay instead, allowing the device’s operators to monitor calls and texts made by these phones, their movements, and the numbers of who they text and call.

As StingRays have a radius of about 1km, an attempt to monitor a suspect’s phone in a crowded city center could amount to tens of thousands of phones being tapped.

Until late 2015, warrants weren’t required for StingRay-enabled cellphone tracking; currently, around a dozen states outlaw the use of eavesdropping tech unless in criminal investigations, yet many agencies don’t obtain warrants for their use.

Likelihood

While the average citizen isn’t the target of a StingRay operation, it’s impossible to know what is done with extraneous data captured from non-targets, thanks to tight-lipped federal agencies.

How to protect yourself

  • Use encrypted messaging and voice call apps, particularly if you enter a situation that could be of government interest, such as a protest. Signal (free, iOS/Android) and Wickr Me (free, iOS/Android) both encrypt messages and calls, preventing anyone from intercepting or interfering with your communications. Most encryption in use today isn’t breakable, says Wisniewski, and a single phone call would take 10-15 years to decrypt.

“The challenging thing is, what the police have legal power to do, hackers can do the same,” Wisniewski says. “We’re no longer in the realm of technology that costs millions and which only the military have access to. Individuals with intent to interfere with communications have the ability to do so.”

From security insiders to less tech-savvy folk, many are already moving away from traditional, unencrypted communications – and perhaps in several years, it’ll be unthinkable that we ever allowed our private conversations and information to fly through the ether unprotected.

[image credit: hacker smartphone concept via BigStockPhoto]



Discussion loading

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Help

From Esperanza franco on March 10, 2017 :: 7:33 am

My hubends phone has been hacked mutipule time and they are using all my emails to do so need help to stop it

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Help is on it's away

From Geo metro on April 23, 2017 :: 12:12 pm

Don’t worry I’ll help you!!! Before going into the system I would want to know, what is the name of your phone?

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Help me

From Sarah on April 25, 2017 :: 6:07 am

Hi my sister erased everything on my iPod 6 and we don’t know the email or password to our iCloud and do not want to tell our parents is their any way we can hack it and bring everything back

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May not be possible, but you can try

From Josh Kirschner on April 25, 2017 :: 8:24 am

There is no way to “hack” your iPod to bring everything back. However, it may be possible to recover some of the data using data recovery tools. This article explains one of the ways to do it: http://www.macworld.com/article/2095226/how-to-recover-lost-data-from-your-iphone-ipad-or-ipod-touch.html.

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my phone is a galaxy7active

From ginny meyer on July 05, 2017 :: 8:27 am

my phone is a galaxy7active omg it’s a lemon and AT&T lied to me I don’t think it was a mistake it came in a box all packed calling it brand new I feel tricked when AT&T help said it was a referbished phone by the one I number! how can they get away with that it’s a terrible uncaring to their customers AT&T doesn’t seem to want to help !

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FORD SEL TRURUS

From Sally hedlund on July 21, 2017 :: 1:31 pm

My phone is hacked and every thing else in home and car

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SAMSUNG GALAXY 3 VOICE ACTIVATED

From Sally hedlund on July 21, 2017 :: 1:43 pm

I ve been hacked body hacked also followed every where shower also under tortor mindreading equipment plus car followed all stores and every where i go in car had bladder infectionmfrom being hit where you pee run all down leg more of all tortor things looked it up on computer mind reading equipment any one know how to get this off of us people lie and use other friends name make you think they are your friends but not tell stories about people and lifemstorys to how do you get off this i would like to know is this legal or a control thur are groverment 7f is dont you have have training for it atmibm or colleges now

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You are being gang stalked.

From Jean on August 24, 2017 :: 11:37 pm

You are being gang stalked. Look it up

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Hack Proofing

From James on October 04, 2017 :: 4:48 pm

This might not help your mindset unfortunately, however, while the people who can help pinpoint and describe the most common ways to digitally compromise somebodies privacy and also help close and reinforce the windows on potential hackers…
They can also hack your phone alot easier than the average joe

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Hacked

From Suzi on March 17, 2018 :: 8:23 pm

Mine to sally, I’m monitored 24/7 😔

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Could be...

From Debby on March 29, 2018 :: 5:39 pm

Could be you are gang stalked or multiple stalkers. Google it. There are ways to make it difficult or and this requires a lot of work and energy to make it almost impossible for them. Do so soon bc if you are it will get worse..much worse if what Ive heard from many who are is correct.

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My asus zenfone max was

From Melwish on August 31, 2017 :: 8:15 pm

My asus zenfone max was hacked , and my frind phone aslo , sumsung j1. Every msg can read hacker , how can i stop this hack , pliz help me

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my cell phone and email seems to be hacked

From steve on September 06, 2017 :: 2:23 pm

I get dozens of text and email from people who say thay saw my pic on craigslist, even more upsettng Iam getting text from people saying I texted them from my phone. I have no idea who these people are

)Please assist

STEVE

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Sounds more like a prank than hacking

From Josh Kirschner on September 06, 2017 :: 4:22 pm

It sounds like someone posting a Craigslist listing with your info, rather than hacking. Did you try doing a Google search on your email address of Craigslist to see what is being posted?

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Help

From Robin on October 31, 2017 :: 8:29 pm

My phone has been acting up being weird

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well don't worry

From Leah The Devil Queen on March 07, 2018 :: 7:02 pm

Don’t worry my phone and I pad is not working do I’m useing myself tablet the only normal one

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Help please

From Thandekayo on February 07, 2018 :: 5:27 am

My phone has been hacked too I’m getting calls from different number but its a same voice,that person has pointed my boy friend with a gun on free while driving

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My phone is stolen

From Honer 9 lite on July 15, 2018 :: 1:39 am

My phone is stolen in my class
Plzz help me to find my lost phone

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My phone is stolen

From Honer 9 lite on July 15, 2018 :: 1:42 am

Plzz help me i want my phone back i have very personal in that phone help me plzzz

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My phone is stolen

From Mizpah flora on July 15, 2018 :: 1:46 am

My phone is honer 9 lite i bought before 1 moth my phone is stolen so plzzz help me to find my phone I have some very personal in my phone ao plzźzz help me plzzzz

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Use Android phone locator

From Josh Kirschner on July 16, 2018 :: 11:24 am

File a police report, of course, and try using the Android Find My Device to see if you can track down its location: https://www.techlicious.com/tip/how-to-find-your-phone/.

If you had a good password for your lock screen, that should prevent anyone from accessing the information on your phone.

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hijacked!

From kris g on October 18, 2018 :: 11:17 am

I know something ir someone gas got my phone..cant figure it out..lots of weird like phones on google acct that says this is phone u r on..but im not..log ins from unrecognized browsers..cant do 2 step authentication

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FYI

From NeilFumicelli on August 27, 2017 :: 4:39 am

I had a friend that got his phone hacked by spouse. He told her one day that he put aGPS on her phone, but he didn’t… He just wanted to make her confess where she was for the past few days, not important anymore, I hope he is doing better, he said his new phone is hacked too, but why? Who cares about his phone activities? He told me he doesn’t want to go to court with his wife because he doesn’t want to put her through anymore emotional stress. He is Happy for her and wants to do like the rest of the people who get divorced. Hopefully his wife will negotiate with him because he told me that he will rather die than walk away empty handed.

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??

From James on October 04, 2017 :: 1:06 pm

Are these people on meth? Funny… People that take “points” of meth cant even stick to the point in convo

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the best

From Brian on November 01, 2018 :: 7:15 pm

These comments are awesome! I dont know if its translation issues, but they keep getting better! Keep up the fine work, Lol

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New phone

From Patricia White on December 03, 2017 :: 7:52 pm

My phone has been hacked into so will buying a a new phone sort the problem out

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help me

From lllllliiiiiiiiiiilllllyyyyyyy on January 18, 2018 :: 12:46 pm

my phone has loads of blue and yellow lines horisantal and vertical and i have to ask siri to go on a app in 11 and i really need help please reply with some segestions if i turn it off and then back on it still does not work so what shall i do

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Sounds like your screen is damaged

From Josh Kirschner on January 18, 2018 :: 1:30 pm

This sounds like a screen issue, not a hacking issue. I would take it into your local Apple store to have the display evaluated - it sounds like you may need to replace it. YOu can have it replaced at the Apple store (expensive, unless covered by warranty) or find an independent repair ship to do it.

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Help

From Tearesa Holland on March 27, 2018 :: 11:28 pm

Someone has hacked my kik account and is messaging contacts on there saying stuff I would never say

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Most posts here do not make sense, beware.

From someone who cares on March 30, 2018 :: 10:37 am

most comments here do no look legit
or
people do not know how to write properly anymore
please check your grammar

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Targeted individual

From Tina on June 06, 2018 :: 4:13 pm

U are a targeted individual.
#1rule is u must be surveillanced 24 hours 7. Days a week.they break into my home when I’m not there and install audio and cameras.i have had my food poisoned.they put something into my shampoo to make my hair fall out by the clumps.
#2 they Will contact everyone u have contact with.then they become community police.which then work for your stalkers or they send a perp to u to become friends boyfriend.
#3 they hack every phone u get through cell towers and ur Wi-Fi connections.so any time u get a new phone or phone number.they get all ur info cause u gotta connect to some Wi-Fi or the 1st call u make hits a cell tower to connect u.so my phone is hacked they can control all functions of my phone.they use it to record me wen I’m not on the phone they can record any sound in the room I’m in.and they can take pics of me through my camera on my phone.all this is done while I’m not using my phone.the use my phone to track location.they use it as a connection. To the above 2 rules.

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Help

From Debbie on October 11, 2018 :: 2:10 pm

So how do you get your phone back ? And stop them from controlling it again. I don’t have any control of my phone, they do. What can I do.

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Don't believe

From Stucknmal on April 22, 2017 :: 5:36 pm

I have used every anti Mal were app there is and never done nothing for me it is my beliefs that at one time is how they were accessing my account I’ve tried everything I could come up with and followed all the flashing and shaking things on the screen to mostly be hacked deeper and I’m lost and don’t care any more and anytime I ever tried to track someone it has never worked out for me r my phone flips out r something but every thing says the same thing and nothing works for me but if anyone knows something I don’t please fill me in cause I’m stuck I gang??? Can’t remember but I’m stuck and every playing game and trying to ruin ur life well I’m not playing anymore just waiting for a slip then it will be my time to shine thanks and he fun til the slip

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Google instant app

From pocha on May 28, 2017 :: 11:05 pm

I do not want google instant app on my phone but someone keeps downloading it on here.I uninstall it but they put it right back on here. Who and why would they be doing this

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iPhone 7 plus have been hacked

From Jemma on May 31, 2017 :: 2:58 pm

Both of my iPhone 7 plus have been “hacked” because the hackers manage to repeat all my activities via phone in-front of me. Example repeat the WhatsApp text message, whatsapp call conversation. We chat text message, and even to record the life conversation. The hackers donor have chances to touch my IPhone but they just know my Apple ID and contact number. However I have changed my Apple ID and contact number but they still manage to listen to my daily conversation with others. Please help….

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How do they do it

From Melisa on June 11, 2017 :: 2:00 am

Me too, the hackers have never physically held my device yet they repeat my whatsapp conversations and know my phone conversations, and they know exactly where I am and sometimes they know what ive said at certain times perhaps from the tracking the microphone.  this is an iPhone 6s how do they do it

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Is someone hacking into my phone

From Vicky on August 21, 2017 :: 6:26 pm

I have a iPhone 5s and recently I never pick up missed calls or messages an even voice messages I have never had a problem before as I have had a iPhone 4 before this is really frustrating as friends and family have told me they have tried to contact me please could you advise me

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Doesn't sound like hacking

From Josh Kirschner on August 22, 2017 :: 11:35 am

This sounds like some sort of technical issue outside of hacking. You can try resetting your iPhone to see if that fixes the issue or take it to a local Genius Bar to have them take a look.

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Question: please help!

From Shauntay on June 03, 2018 :: 12:22 am

I think my iPhone is hacked. I have been in the middle of a conversation on my iMessage app, and I can visually see my phone typing on it’s own without me even touching any buttons and I have sat there on several occasions and witnessed the hacker able to pretend to be a sender that I know and then respond back literally from my phone while I’m in the middle of responding back to that person.  How many times do I have to factory reset my phone to get rid of this issue? I’m seriously thinking of changing everything including my email and phone number and iCloud account ID just to get rid of this problem. What do you think I need to do instead of going through something as extreme as this?

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iPhone hack

From Emma on January 08, 2018 :: 11:45 am

Hi Jemma

I have same issue all my devices are hacked and the hacker and some people follow everywhere I go.Have you got any help?They even on kids phones

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Hacked and followed

From Debbie on March 29, 2018 :: 6:00 pm

It’s called gang stalking. Don’t know who does it but it’s a round the world thing that only happens to targeted individuals. you can make it difficult for them or almost impossible if you want to put in lots work and effort. Don’t think they are using the average apps but another device. Get another phone, do not call anyone you have previously, don’t give your number out to the public and if at home take the battery out if you can. They listen in your conservation’s and can track even with the phone off unless the battery is dead or not on. It does get worse..things unbelievable to general public as they use advance technology or doing stuff like replacing your dish washer with one that does not work and isn’t even the same model. Get bumper proof locks if you can.

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It doesn't matter if u

From Tina on June 06, 2018 :: 4:25 pm

It doesn’t matter if u get a new phone number or phone .I am also a targeted individual. They get all ur new info through cell towers and Wi-Fi connections. And now they have these new towers that can hack ANYTHING they want through ur electronic devices.everything needs a connection

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Me too makes 3 girl targets. The followers I’ve seen all men

From Sue on July 22, 2018 :: 7:09 am

Hacked & passwords changed so often I no longer have a functioning email account or any social media. Can’t share info, crowdfund or pay bills online…phone a joke, fwding to unknown number, screen froze when given to virus removal kiosk. Theyre able to get into houses, stolen usbs, portable hardIve ..  & weird things.. tea towels, sunblock… the ones following hide their faces . I saw one with a device that popped locks on neighbours gates

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ID theft via phone

From Leo on June 07, 2017 :: 1:49 am

My I phone 6 was hacked five years ago for the past five years I have had to rebuild my identity. The worst part is that this has cost me to loose work and has hindered me finding work. As they stole my resume. Is there anything I can do to regain my life back?

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Hacked phone??

From Amanda on June 15, 2017 :: 2:32 pm

I got some inappropriate texts from my father in law, sexual in nature.  When I showed my husband,  he denied sending them and claims his phone was hacked.  My question is, could a phone be hacked to send these messages?  Nobody else got ANY messages,  nothing else was disrupted either.  Could this even happen??

Thank you!!

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Phone hacked

From Jamme on June 22, 2017 :: 1:11 pm

Amanda,
I am in a similar boat.  I noticed odd numbers on my phone bill connected to my husbands phone, when i google the numbers that text messages were exchanged with they are to escort services and things of the like.  He denies ever sending texts to these numbers and no one else I know of has EVER had this issue.  A similar thing happened 6 years ago and a year after that.  And when I go back in the phone records, I can see the last 5-6 months that this has happened.

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Husband

From Xfactor on November 30, 2018 :: 3:33 am

Your husband has a secret life that he is not telling you about. He is being inauthentic / dishonest with you. You are not being hacked.

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Please tell me if m

From facebook120025445256953 on June 15, 2017 :: 5:46 pm

Please tell me if m my phone is hAcked

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How do you know if my calls has been hacked

From Portia on June 19, 2017 :: 1:29 am

Hie I really need your help I thinks my boyfriend is hacking my call could you help me his phone number is 0766983409 and my number is 0725821450
Thanks

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Hy could you please helps

From Portia on June 19, 2017 :: 1:31 am

Hy could you please helps I need to know who hacking my calls my no 0725821450

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issues with a new galaxy7active started having issues withit day onewhen i received it in themail fr

From ginny meyer on July 05, 2017 :: 8:22 am

ON my galaxy7active I’ve crashed someone got into my AT&T email my walgreensaccount andmy medical chart my walgreens account I’ve been recorded my text has been read by someone I try to go for help with art google my sending fails IMY batteryis draining faster then my fastcharger! it us serious! I called AT&T I was supposed to get this phone brand new replacement of my lgv10 700.00 after 3 refurbished phones I wasoffered this active or edge the 3rd time I called AT&T warrenty they told me by my imei # its a referbished! told me to call assurance and all he talked about he had the same one didn’t do anything anyone going thru all this I don’t know what to do I thought over the phone with AT&T its always recorded for their safety ! who should I call i know the maker of my phone is offering help with a ticketnumber to call them i guess I will how can AT&T get away with that it’s a terrible thing calling it a mistake! I plan on later getting a new phone but not from them it’s been going on 4 months! I feel I was scammed by them! I need answers on help!

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